Tag Archives: health

My 2016 Year in Review – Topping My Charts

I have just returned from another fabulous Winter weekend in the Adirondacks to celebrate the New Year. While I was there I had gotten in some ample cross-training time skate-skiing, hiking and some photography. This outdoor time gave me a good amount of time to reflect upon the last year. I keep hearing others saying over-and-over how 2016 was such a horrible year, but for me, not so much.

Cascade Moutain – Lake Placid, Adirondacks, New York

You would think that as one gets closer to the big 5-0 that PR’s and things would become less frequent. But my 48th year was full of them. What is up with that? Perhaps the fact that I had well preserved myself well during my 20’s and 30’s may have something to do with that.

December(2015) was full of Winter cross-training in Banff National Park in Western Canada. They had gotten a good amount of early season snow there and Lake Placid had none. We hit the downhill slopes at Lake Louise and Sunshine Village, got some snowshoeing in on the Bow River and a ton of photographing the beautiful Winter scenery on the Icefields Parkway leading to Jasper.

Business, Canada, Company, Corporation, SmugMug, banff, feature, lake louise, mountain, rockies

First Light on the Icefields Parkway

In January, we had plans to spend a week in the warmth of Sedona, AZ but that was cut short due to a blizzard that delayed flights for several days. We still ended up with an amazing, activity packed long weekend there. We got out for some amazing hikes and photography some beautiful scenery. I replenished my vitamin D store with the clear skies and bright sunshine. It was a great reset before turning my attention back to the long Ironman training season that lies ahead.

Chillin’ on the Bell Rock Vortex

In February I started up my official Ironman training season with Todd Wiley. I had gotten to know Todd over the last year or so through some of his workshops and Lake Placid training camp and really like his personality. He was a prior pro triathlete and has had a lot of success with some pretty high-level athletes over the years, so I thought I would see what he could do with this old, average dude. My goals for the season was to increase my IM run performance while maintaining my bike and swim and finalizing that with a sub-12 hour Ironman.

In March, I had my first official race of the season, The St. Pat’s Allentown 5k. While it is only a 5k, this would be the first test of my fitness to see what I had accomplished during the last two months. I would also use this as my Lactate Threshold(LT) test for my training. It did not disappoint. I finished with a 1 sec PR of 22:45(chip time) over my prior PR from 2013. 3 years older and getting faster.

St. Pat's West End 5k 2016

St. Pat’s West End 5k 2016

In April, I took things up a notch and competed in the local St. Luke’s Half Marathon which I hadn’t run in since 2013 when I ran with my wife. I was planning to run it in 2015, but got a stomach bug the morning of and had to bail. My current PR for this race, and half marathons in general, was from back in 2010 when I finished with a 1:46:41(chip time). I also had challenged my co-worker Steve, who is what I would consider more of a “runner”, to a duel for this race. It was a bit of a stretch, but I thought the extra competition would bring out a little extra in motivation for me. Although I didn’t come close to beating him, I did manage to eke out another PR for myself finishing in 1:45:10 after 6 years. 2 races and two PRs…not too shabby a start to 2016.

Next up was my first triathlon of the season, the French Creek Olympic Triathlon. I had never done this race before, so I didn’t have anything to compare it to. I knew it was a pretty brutal race with a very hilly bike and run, so you could not even compare it to any other Olympic Distance race. I obviously did not PR this race, but I did end up on the podium by taking 3rd in my age group. This was the first podium since my very first multisport race, the Belleplain Duathlon, back in 2008 where I finished 1st in my age group. So now 3 races and 3 top outcomes.

French Creek Tri Podium

French Creek Tri Podium

In June I traveled up to Syracuse, NY for the Ironman 70.3 Syracuse triathlon. Another race I had never done before, but was hoping for a good finish here given the prior results so far this season. The race started off well with one of my best half-iron swims and a decent bike leg where I felt I hadn’t “burned too many matches.” The run leg was a different story. The sun came out and the heat turned up towards the end of the bike and my body turned to mush. Reminiscent of the Ironman Couer d’Alene run I fell into a walk-run for the very hilly run course. Ok, you can’t have them all! So with no PR to be had this time, I took my setbacks here and turned it into motivation for the true goal “A” race of the season at Ironman Mont-Tremblant.

Finish Run Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016

Hurtin’ for Certain – Ironman 70.3 Syracuse 2016 – High Temps on the run left a little to be desired for this race.

July turned out to be a pretty hot month, so I gained some pretty good acclimatization to the heat while training. If Ironman Mont-Tremblant (IMMT) was going to cook me like Syracuse, I was now prepared. Well, as much as someone who does not like the heat can be.

August came around quickly and tapering was in full swing as we made our way up to Mont-Tremblant for the peak race of my year. When race day came I could not have asked for better weather conditions. It was very cloudy in the morning as I prepared to hit the water. A fighter jet buzzed us so close it brought tears to my eyes. Then the cannon blasted and we were off. The rain started during the swim and poured down all day! For me, that was perfect conditions. I was like a pig in the slop.

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 Bike Rain

Terrential Downpours on the bike leg of Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016

Due to some choppy lake conditions, my swim was not as fast as I thought it would be, but still one of my faster IM swims. My bike was one of my fastest so far but yet I still held back as I planned to save something for the run. The run was my best ever Ironman run. The rain came down and kept me cool while cranking out some 8:30-9:00 pace miles. I felt amazing the whole time. I blew away my sub-12 hour goal by about 14 minutes and coming away with an Ironman PR of around 50 minutes! I chopped off almost 30 minutes on my IM run time alone. Mission accomplished!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Finish

So now 5 races completed for this year and 3 of them were PR’s and 1 podium. What more could I ask for? A fabulous end to an epic season for sure. Proof that aging does not mean you get slower. At least not yet. Maybe by the time I am 50 I can qualify for Kona? 🙂

Usually with the last race of the season comes a little depression that it is all over for another year. I like to schedule something big for after my last race that keeps me on the up-and-up. Just when you think things can’t get any better we headed to Iceland for a two-week journey around the island in a camper.

Kirkjufellfoss – Iceland 2016

I let my body recuperate a bit and broke out my camera for an incredible trip. It was the perfect diversion for someone who has only thought about training for the last year. The scenery was out-of-this-world and it was a great end to all the hard work that was put in over the last 8 months. I have been working on a full report blog post on this trip which I hope to be published very soon. Stay tuned for that.

While you would think that was all for this year, I had to do one more race. I signed up for the local South Mountain 10-miler run which was kind of a birthday run for me. I had never done this race before, but it looked to be quite challenging. It starts not too far from the Lehigh Univesity’s Goodwin Campus fields and a makes it was up to the very top of South Mountain, turns around and heads back down again. It is very steep and a big slog. I ended up 40th overall and 6th in my age group. Not a great result really, but I maintained a 8:12 pace which is just a bit off my half marathon pace. It was more for fun so I am not too worried about that.

I concentrated on my photography a bit for the remainder of the year, which tends to play 2nd fiddle to my training. I made a couple trips to Lake Placid and a short trip to Salt Springs State Park(PA) for some photography sessions. I came away with some keepers and also started getting more active with my Instagram feed. I dug back into my photo archives and found some great pictures I had taken in the past that never made it off my laptop.

So now as we head off into 2017 and I set my sights on Ironman Boulder and the inaugural Ironman 70.3 Lake Placid this year, I have great memories looking back on the amazing year that was 2016. Despite what many others have felt. I have so much to be thankful for. I can only hope that 2017 is even half as good as last year.

I can only hope that 2017 is even half as good as last year. Although, it is already shaping up to be a pretty full one. I have several races on the docket and plans are already being hashed out for an amazing trip to Croatia and Slovenia during post-race season. As for goals, Ironman Boulder should be a challenge in itself given the altitude so I am not putting any time goals on myself for that. Perhaps working on pacing myself would be enough. I think Ironman 70.3 Lake Placid may be my A race for the year and I would like to shoot for a half-iron distance PR there.

My other goal for 2017 is to get back to regular blogging here. I have fell off the wagon a bit over the past year so I hope to pick that up again. I have just “cut the cord” and cancelled my cable TV subscription, so besides saving money I plan on spending a little less time in front of the tube.

If you are reading this, I hope you had a great 2016 and a even better 2017 as well. Thanks for reading!

Ironman Mont-Tremblant 2016 – Feeling pretty relaxed after finishing and just coming back from my post-race massage.

Swag Bag-October 26, 2015

Training Wisely

Some good words of wisdom from Joe Friel on Training Risk. You cannot train at high intensity all the time and if you are in zone 2 all the time you will never improve. Finding the right balance of intensity without overtraining or injury is the key to improving performance effectively. Note: The background image on this page makes this really hard to read. I would suggest copy and pasting the text to a text editor for reading.

Universal Sports Gone

Universal Sports Gone

No More Free Rides…

So my favorite virtual reality game-like training riding app, Zwift, will no longer be free. 🙁 They will be starting their subscription model on October 29th, just in time for the Winter training season. If you don’t sign up you will get a 30-day free trial at first, but then you have to pay up. Pricing is $10/month.

One new addition is a new workout mode which should give TrainerRoad a run for their money. Although from what I can see so far, TrainerRoad should be fine for sometime. DC Rainmaker did a nice review of the workout mode here which you should check out if your are interested.

No More Universal Sports Network

I have been bugging my cable provider for ages to get this channel which broadcasted many athletic endurance events. Well, I guess they are off the hook now. Bummer for those who were able to get this channel.

Carb Up!

Despite all the recent low-carb fad BS, this recent study provides additional evidence to further back up our need to for carbohydrates for performance. Check out the tables for key guidelines and formulas for calculating your carb needs.
Carbohydrates for training and competition

Not all Fats & Carbs are Created Equal

There has been a lot of BS in the media about how butter and animal fats are supposed to be good for us. Most of the study’s that these ideas were based on were severely flawed. Well, here is more sensible article on some of the fats that really are good for us. Hint, butter is not one of them. Also, a nice explanation about glycemic index which is a good inidicator of the carbs we should eat and the ones we should save for the aid stations during an Ironman.

On Not Finding Your Passion…

Funny but interesting dose of reality if you are seeking out “your passion” from Mark Manson.

I Won’t Say It. But I …

I can’t pass this one up! The World Health Organization announced today that processed meats are on the same cancer-causing level as cigarettes and formaldehyde. Yeah, not to mention that they are the biggest cause of climate change and an extremely inefficient use of resources. I would highly urge you to also check out Cowspiracy movie which is now available on Netflix.

Well, that’s all for this week. Things kind of went in a nutritional slant this week, but hope to balance things out a bit here, but that was just what I came across this week. Enjoy!

 

 

Heart Rate Variability iOS App Comparison

I decided it was time to reassess my Heart Rate Variability(HRV) iOS application of choice. I was very surprised when I did a recent search of “HRV” in the iOS App Store to find a bunch of new HRV apps out there. I have been using the Sweetbeat Heart Rate Variability(HRV) iOS app ever since I started measuring HRV. There have always been a few shortcomings of this application that annoyed me, but there were no other options at the time. So, now I decided to pick a couple and compare them with the Sweetbeat app.

What I was looking for was a iOS app with following requirements:

  • Price – reasonably priced(<= $10)
  • BT HRM – Works with a Bluetooth HR Monitor strap(Wahoo)
  • Quick – Be able to quickly measure HRV/HR once-a-day before getting out of bed.
  • Consistent – Consistent HRV measurement with my previous Sweetbeat historical measurement.
  • Export – Export of historical HRV/HR data to text/csv/Excel format for further analysis.
  • Tag/Comment – Ability to tag(multiples) and/or comment each reading.

Armed with this criteria, I ended up choosing the iThlete and HRV+ apps from the App Store and comparing them to the existing Sweetbeat app. I will start with my assessment of the Sweetbeat, since that is my baseline app which I had been using previously. Keep in mind that I am not going into every detail of each of these apps in a DCR style, but more looking at how each app meets my requirements and use case. If you have different requirements then I do, then may have a different outcome.

Sweetbeat Life

(www.sweetwaterhrv.com)

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Price

When I first started using the Sweetbeat app, it was $4.99 in the Apple App Store. A bit pricey compared to most apps at that time, but if my training could benefit from it then it was money well spent. They eventually came out with a totally new version of the app, Sweetbeat Life, which was basically same app with a few enhancements. They also doubled the price, now $9.99 with no option to upgrade from the previous app either. I tried to continue using the older app, but it appeared they were no longer maintaining it and it became very buggy. I was forced to purchase the new version despite their enhancements not providing me any real value. So, for long time, loyal users $14.98, new users $9.99. Ok

Bluetooth HRM

The Sweetbeat iOS app works with either a Bluetooth Smart HR monitor(i.e. Wahoo) or a VitalConnect Healthpatch monitor. The VitalConnect Healthpatch monitor is a HRM that is constantly stuck to your chest and allows you to measure HRV anytime. Not sure who would want this functionality 24×7, but it is one of the new features they added. It does work with Bluetooth HRM. Pass

Quick Measurement

Sweetbeat recommends that you create a baseline HRV reading the first time you use the app. To take an HRV measurement, you tap the start button on the main screen , which then presents you with a dialog of 3 types of HRV tests: Monitor Stress, HR Recovery and HRV for Training. For me the last one is all I am interested in. You are quickly presented with another dialog stating that your “Bluetooth Smart Chest Strap is not Detected” which you have to hit ok. You are then presented with another “Bluetooth Smart Chest Strap is not Detected” dialog warning before you can do anything. The first time I got this had been after using another HRV app which I had used my BT HRM strap so I knew it was connected. I eventually realized this is a bug which requires you to start the twice just to get to start measuring your HRV. I thought they would have fixed this by now, but it has been there for some time now.

Once you get passed the plethora of screen prompts and messages it finally starts measuring your HRV. By now, my HRV has probably dropped numerous points due to the stress of all the screens I had to go through to get started. The test sampling time is 3 minutes after it receives a certain amount of readings. Based on what I have seen over that time it is a bit of overkill since the readings pretty much flatten out after a minute or so. Most of the other apps are only a minute. Once the test is complete you are presented with a graph of your readings over time and your reading today, previous and last week. Once you accumulate a bunch of readings this trend graph is pretty much useless and there is now way to filter out the amount here. In order to get your resting heart rate(RHR) for the session, you have to flip through multiple screens to obtain that value from a very odd graph page. I don’t understand why they could not put all of these values on one dashboard style screen and be done with it. Instead you have to scroll sideways through seven different screens, many of which have a large amount of wasted “real estate” on them. Stephen Few and any UX expert would have a field day with this app. So I would have to say that this was the most cumbersome of all the apps regarding speed of measurement. Fail

Consistent

Since I am using this app as my baseline, I guess I would have to say it fairly consistent. Although after I had been using the original app for some time, the folks at Sweetwater decided to change their measuring algorithm, which basically made all of my previous data history useless. The whole reason I use this app is to identify trends and when they go changing things it basically makes it unusable. They haven’t changed their algorithm for some time and it appears that the old app and new app seem to be similar now, so hopefully that was a once and done thing. Ok

Data Export

I believe any application that is measuring your personal health data should provide some mechanism for you to extract or export that raw data for your personal use. It is MY data, therefore I should be able to access it in raw format. I also like to take that data and join it up with other training or health data to look for patterns using something like QlikView or other data analysis tools. The Sweetbeat application provides no such functionality. You can only view your data within the confines of their iOS application or on their website, which provides nothing but a calendar showing color-coded entries for your readings. Nothing really useful. In fact, to gather the data for this comparison I had to scroll through the multitude of screens for each day to get the raw data and enter it manually in a spreadsheet. Why they cannot provide a link to download a CSV of your data is beyond me, but they don’t. The graphs in their application are so poorly laid out, that it is hard to get any information out of them, especially when you have a lot of readings. The graphs do not even change when in landscape mode to take advantage of the extra space. Fail

Tag/Comments

The ability to add some commentary or tagging to your readings is very helpful when analyzing the data and looking for outliers over time. The Sweetbeat app allows you to tag your reading with one tag only, which you have to scroll to the 6th(of 7) screen after your reading to set. You are basically forced to tag it with “HRV” though if you want your data to show in that set. So there is no possibility of setting other things like “Poor Sleep”, “Tough Training Day”, “Too many beers”, etc. So, you might as well not even have a tag here. There is no ability to comment either. Fail

I have been a user of this app from the beginning and have participated in their beta testing for their new app too. I had given them a bunch of feedback before the launch of their new app about the items mentioned above. They never implemented any of them. Instead they focused on the VitalConnect monitor that is constantly stuck to you and a Correlation screen that I still cannot garner anything valuable from. It links up with some Withings, Fitbit, and MapMyWhatever devices, which I use none of. Perhaps it is more useful if you use those. I still don’t know who would want to voluntarily have a monitor stuck to their chest 24×7 to read HRV. But hey, there must be some other use cases out there if they are putting that much effort into it. The user interface/experience(UX) on this application is in great need of a facelift. The amount of screens and poor use and layout of graphs really takes away from the usability of this app.

HRV+

(www.hrvplus.com)

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Price

It’s free! You cannot get much cheaper than that. Pass

Bluetooth HRM

The HRV+ app says it requires the Polar H6 or H7 Bluetooth heart rate monitor. I am using a Wahoo Bluetooth monitor and it seems to work fine. Pass

Quick Measurement

This app connect pretty quickly with your HRM monitor. There is a “HRM Not Connected”(in red) or “HRM Connected” (in white) at the top left of the main screen that lets you know if it is ready to go. I love the fact that there are no pop-up dialogs to tell you it is or isn’t connected.

After pressing the start button, your measurement takes 1 minutes and you then presented with a screen that gives you all your reading information in one clear, concise screen. You even have the ability to enter comments 🙂 and TRIMP value. Not sure why I would have a TRIMP value first thing in the morning though. Fast and simple. Pass!

Consistent

This HRV readings for HRV+ seem to run several points above what I get in the Sweetbeat app. I had run side-by-side comparisons for a week and this apps’ HRV value averaged about 10 points above, with the exception of my first reading being extremely higher than SB. I later compared the rMSSD(“root mean square of successive differences“) values of Sweetbeat and HRV+, which is more of a standarized measurement, and those were different as well, only not as much.

It is really difficult to do an apples-to-apples comparison here, since the measurements are taken 1 to 3 minutes apart. I have already taken several repetitive HRV measurements with the Sweetbeat app and gotten very different results only a few minutes later.

On average, the HRV+ app ran about 11.4 points above the Sweetbeat readings.

 

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I would say if you have never taken HRV measurements before or are not looking to compare to other results, then this app is fairly consistent by itself. The price may also dictate leaning this way too. Ok

Data Export

Yes! Not only does it have a CSV export, but you can also import and/or sync any other older data in the same format. They even go one step further and allow you to connect it to your Dropbox so you always have your data sitting there in your online folder. Very nice feature. You can also email yourself the csv export.

Additionally, there is a raw R-R HRV export capability. I believe this is a standardized format that some heart rate variability analysis programs use(Kubios?), but I am not real familiar with that. Pass

Tag/Comments

As I stated before, you can easily enter comments after each reading. If you need tagging you can come up with your own tagging scheme in the comments for searching later. Pass

Summary

Overall, I would say this is a great app for someone looking to start out measuring HRV without spending any money. It is a simple design that works. It has all the features I am looking for and the data export to DropBox is a bonus.

 

 

iThlete

(myithlete.com)

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Price

$9.99. Same as the newer Sweetbeat Life app and at the top of the range.

Bluetooth HRM

Yes. It paired up with my Wahoo HRM very quickly. They also sell a CardioSport Bluetooth Smart HRM on their website. It also works with a Finger sensor or ECG receiver on their website as well. Pass

Quick Measurement

When you first go into the app it takes you directly to the monitoring screen. It does pop up an annoying dialog to tell you that your “Bluetooth Smart Sensor connected” which I feel is a bit annoying and unncessary. Once you tap ok then you have to wait 10-15 seconds for a little green start button to enable. Then you can take your 1 minute reading. There is a little breath rhythm coach that guides your breathing if you are staring at the screen. There is a little countdown timer to let you know how much time is left which is very readable compared to the other apps.

Once your measurement session completes, you are presented with a screen showing your HRV colored appropriately to match the level of your reading(Green is good, grey is in the neutral, and red is bad). Your heart rate is not displayed anywhere on this page, which was a bit of a disappointment. There are a bunch of sliders to let you set ratings of how you felt. More on this in the Tag/Comments section. You can set your slider values and hit save and you are done. Pass

Consistent

The HRV values for this app seem to be a little more on par with the Sweetbeat values from what I can tell. The graphs above seem to indicate this although Ithlete does seem to show higher values as overall HRV increases. On average, iThlete runs about 7.8 points above the Sweetbeat app.

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Data Export

Yes. There is an “Export Data” option on the main menu. From there you can either email or download a csv export of all your data to DropBox. The export also includes all the values from the ratings scales post measurement. Pass

Tag/Comments

The iThelete app far surpassed the other apps in this area. After each measurement you can quickly rate the following items using a slider for each: sleep quality, fatigue, muscle soreness, stress, mood, and diet. This is great and may alleviate the need to even type in comments. There is also a comments box and a Training Score box too. PASS(with flying colors).

Summary

Despite the $10 price tag and the one pop-up dialog, I really like this app. The data values are close to my early Sweetbeat data and I love the ratings sliders. This has been my go-to app since doing the comparison. Price wasn’t a huge issue, since I had already forked out the money for it so I could compare it.

Conclusion

Here is my rating of all the apps on the categories I mentioned using a scale of 1 to 5, 5 being meet or exceed my requirements.

Price

BT HRM

Quick

Consistent Data

Tag / Comments

Export

Overall

Sweetbeat Life 3 4 2 5 1 1 16
HRV+ 5 5 5 3 4 5 27
iThlete 3 5 4 5 5 5 27

Pocket Favorite: Industry Influence on Our Dietary Guidelines

The story behind the first U.S. dietary guidelines explains why, to this day, the decades of science supporting a more plant-based diet have yet to fully translate into public policy.

via Pocket http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/10/22/big-food-wants-final-say-over-health-reports/

One Year Plant-Based…And Why I Am Not Changing…

It is hard to believe that one year ago I was first posting my experiment with a whole foods, plant-based diet. Now here I sit one year later and I am still doing it with the same, if not more, fervor that I did back then. Many things have changed during that time which I can firmly credit to this change in lifestyle. I have no intentions of going back to my old ways of eating. Here are the reasons why…

  •  Weight Management. I have been able to more easily maintain a healthy weight and body fat % throughout the entire year. I have been at same weight I was in high school for the last year. This is regardless of whether I am training a lot or taking it easy in the off-season and over the holidays when I typically gain back about 20 lbs.

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  • No Calorie Counting. Maintaining a healthy weight has also been done without the need to log all my food eaten and counting of calories as I have done in the past to maintain weight. This had always been so time-consuming and as soon as I grew tired of doing it, the weight came back instantly. Now I just eat. As long as it is healthy and as close to possible to its original form and not processed I can eat and be happy.
  • Food is More Nourishing. Eating food closer to its original form provides you with the most essential nutrients you can get. Now eating until you are satisfied takes on a new meaning. Now it is not just that your stomach being packed  to maximum density to indicate being satiated, it is more of your body feels properly nourished by all the essential nutrients to properly function. It is a different kind of “full” feeling. One you will never get eating over-processed foods devoid of the essential nutrients and abundant with chemicals.   
  • Consistent Energy Levels. I used to have the usual afternoon crash around 2-3pm and the trip down to the company café for a afternoon caffeine jolt was becoming far too routine. This was mostly due to all the over-processed carbs and sugar which would spike insulin levels causing the lethargy of the afternoon. Now without these types of foods and more whole, vegetables and legumes for lunch I am able to keep an even keel through out the day.
  • High Volume Training Performance. Last summer I trained from 8 up to 17 hours a week of training until September when I completed my final race. This year I have been consistently training from 10 up to 16 hours(so far, more to come) since the end of January(~5 months). I have been able to do this training without any issues or major fatigue and still perform at my best. I have logged 3 personal best times at races at one Olympic and half-iron distances.
  • Post-Training Energy.This is somewhat related to the High Volume Training Performance above, but after training daily for anywhere from 2 to 6 hours I am still able to function normally with the day-to-day tasks.Previously going for a 4 hour bike ride or a 2.5 hour run on the weekend would put me down napping on the sofa napping for the rest of the afternoon. Now I come home and can be out cutting the grass or other household chores, then out for a some dinner with friends. I do have to admit though, when 10pm rolls around my head is bobbing.
  • Daily Workout Recovery. Despite long, intense workouts everyday, I am able to get up the next day refreshed and ready to take on that days workout. This is especially evident on the weekends when after doing a 4 hour or longer bike ride and brick run on a Saturday, then follow it up on Sunday with a half-marathon or longer distance run. Looking at my weekly average Heart Rate Variablility(HRV), which is a measure of autonomic nervous system, shows that I am actually increasing my HRV as my training volume increases getting closer to Ironman Lake Placid. HRV is a measure from 0 to 100 with higher score means you are adapting better to whatever stress you are placing on your body. For more on that, read this previous post on HRV.

 

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  • Race Performance Improvements. In 2012, I improved my time in the Half Ironman distance by just over 5 minutes on a much more difficult course(Ironman 70.3 Muskoka) than the previous years race(IM Miami 70.3). This year, I was able to once again improve all other previous results in the Half-Ironman distance again on a even more difficult course at Rev3 Quassy by another 8 minutes. This adds up to over 13 minutes in improvement overall. Hopefully this also translates into my 1st full distance Ironman Lake Placid results in July.
  • Biometric Testing Improvements
    • Cholesterol
      • LDL: 48 point drop(-30%)
      • Triglycerides: 37 point drop(-40%)
      • Total Chol: 59 point drop(-25%)
    • Blood Pressure
      • Systolic: –12 mmHg (136 –> 124)
      • Diastolic: –14 mmHg (94 –> 80)
  • Cooking More. Since I am eating less processed foods, I am now forced to do more cooking. It seems that in today’s too busy culture no one cooks anymore. This is pretty sad, since cooking is a therapeutic activity that increases your creativity and your knowledge. 

I am sure there is more advantages to this lifestyle change that I have overlooked, but this are the biggest ones in my mind.